James Cameron's Avatar: The Game
HDR ReShade
By Tore Andersen

James Cameron's Avatar: The Game, developed by Ubisoft Montreal and published by Ubisoft, Lightstorm, Fox Digital & Gameloft in 2009. Prequel to the 2009 Avatar movie, and uses the same stereoscope 3D technology. Even though the game was based on a movie, and clearly relied on the wow-effect of the 3D technology, the game was (and still is) actually pretty good. This custom ReShade will add some new effects like reflective bump-mapping, ambient lighting, better AA, better colors and improved image clarity.

        

 

HDR ReShade (DOWNLOAD)
Download and unpack into the Avatar game-folder

*Note for Windows 10 "Creators update" users:
The Windows 10 Creators update introduced a wide variety of problems for games, especially when using custom renders like ENB or ReShade. Fortunately this can be fixed in two simple steps (LINK)
*See number 4: Fixing the Creators "update"
If this doesn't work on your OS, try downloading the ReShade core files from here (LINK)
After installation, delete everything but the dll file, then copy everything but the dll file from HDR ReShade, so you get the right settings, but keep the dll from the official ReShade installation.
If this doesn't work either, then there is still something in the Windows 10 Creators Update that blocks the custom dll. If you are unable to fix it, you will have to uninstall the ReShade and play without.

That's it, James Cameron's Avatar: The Game is ready to launch.

 

Screenshots

     

     

     

     

 

Comparison Screenshots

   ReShade                                           Original                                                 ReShade                                             Original
    

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   


Game Art

        
 

 

 

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Game Info

James Cameron's Avatar: The Game is a 3rd-person action game based on the 2009 Avatar movie. The game was developed by Ubisoft Montreal and released in 2009 alongside the movie. It uses the same stereoscope 3D technology as the movie, which undoubtedly was a huge sales point. The game takes place before the timeline of the movie, and features some of the same actors, including Sigourney Weaver, Stephen Lang, Michelle Rodriguez, and Giovanni Ribisi. Unfortunately the online part of the game was shut down in August, 2014, and the Game is no longer sold on Steam. It can however still be purchased on Amazon or in local game-stores, and the single player campaign, which is the main focus of the game, is still fun to play.

Avatar: The Game starts in 2152, about years before the events of the movie. A signals-specialist arrives at Pandora, and is assigned to an area called Blue Lagoon. The first mission is about saving 5 marines from Viperwolves. After saving the marines, the player must go help another signals-specialist, Dalton, who is trapped outside the fence. After fixing the fence, the player is told to enter an avatar and get some cell samples from a certain plant. After getting the sample, a Na'vi, askes the player to kill his infected animals. An air strike is then launched on the Na'vi village. A commander and his soldiers arrive via helicopter. The player must now make the game-altering decision of siding with either the Na'vi or the humans. The rest of the game completely depends on this choice, as it will determine what side of the coming war the player will be. The rest of the game is a battle for territory.

Development of the game started in 2007 alongside the making of the film, and in cooperation with James Cameron. The game requires a HDMI video connection and a display with at least 120Hz in order to use the 3D effects. It can use most standard stereoscopic 3D formats used by today's "3D-enabled" screens. The 3D was only supported in the PC release of the game.